Nancy Sinatra will ‘never forgive’ Trump supporters ‘ever,’ singer says

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Nancy Sinatra has no interest in cordiality.

The 80-year-old songstress recently spoke with The Guardian where she chatted about the state of American politics, as well as her views on those that supported former President Donald Trump.

The star has been very vocal in her opposition to the politician since before he was elected. In 2017, when Trump danced to the song “My Way” by her father Frank Sinatra at his inaugural ball, she tweeted: “Just remember the first line of the song. And now the end is near.”

“Yeah, I was probably too outspoken for my own good,” Sinatra admitted to the outlet. “But my passion was running so high.”

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Despite her retrospective feelings, she tries hard to keep Trump’s name out of her vocabulary.

Nancy Sinatra said that she'll 'never forgive' people that supported President Trump. (Photo by Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

Nancy Sinatra said that she’ll ‘never forgive’ people that supported President Trump. (Photo by Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

“I’ve always tried desperately never to mention it, and if I did it would have been with a lowercase ‘t,'” she explained.

Furthermore, Sinatra is not a fan of those who supported him.

“I couldn’t believe that this great nation had sunk so low,” she said. “I’ll never forgive the people that voted for him, ever. I have an angry place inside of me now. I hope it doesn’t kill me.”

Like many stars before her, the thought of another four years of Trump as the president left her considering other options.

“We squeaked by [in the election]. I don’t know what I would have done if Biden had lost,” Sinatra reflected. “It crossed my mind to move to another country.”

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The star has been known as somewhat of a political figure in the music industry, as her hit “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’” became an anthem for women empowerment. She, however, feels differently about the music.

“I didn’t look at songs in that way,” the singer admitted. “The ’60s were disruptive, to say the least. There were protests. My songs were not deliberately chosen to reflect that, but they did anyway.”

She added that she wasn’t interested in making “protest art,” and was more invested in “entertainment” and “fun” as opposed to contemporaries like Joan Baez.

Nancy Sinatra (left) is the daughter of pop legend Frank Sinatra (right). (Photo by Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Nancy Sinatra (left) is the daughter of pop legend Frank Sinatra (right). (Photo by Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Instead, she chose to support the troops throughout the Vietnam War, which made her an outsider in the industry.

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“I felt like an interloper,” Sinatra shared. “When there were get-togethers with current hot musicians they did not treat me as an equal. It hurt. But I stuck to my guns. It might have hurt me in the long run. At least I was true to my beliefs and to the people I was concerned about.”

Additionally, she said that “it was a coincidence that I came of age at the same time as feminism.”

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“We complemented each other. People thought that I was doing things because of women’s lib. I wasn’t,” the singer stated. “It was freedom of expression – it was where I felt comfortable at the time being a woman. Up until that point I had been a girl, and there’s a big difference.”

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